Český Krumlov

Cesky Krumlov on Vltara River

Český Krumlov, German Krumau or Krumau an der Moldau, city, South Bohemia region, southwestern Czech Republic. Situated roughly 15 miles (25 km) southwest of the larger city of České Budějovice, it lies on the Vltava River. The first part of the city’s name, Český, means “Czech,” and the second part, Krumlov, was derived from a German description of the tight bends in the river there.

The town grew up around a Gothic castle, built on the cliffs above the Vltava by Bohemian nobles in the mid-13th century. In the succeeding centuries, aristocratic occupants, including members of the house of Schwarzenberg, expanded the castle, incorporating Renaissance and Baroque elements and ultimately creating one of the largest castle complexes in central Europe. The medieval character of central Český Krumlov has been preserved, and it was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1992. From the Middle Ages to the mid-20th century, the city was populated by a mixture of Czechs and Germans. After the creation of Czechoslovakia in 1918, the Czechoslovak government rejected the German form of the city’s name in favour of the present Czech version, and after World War II the government expelled the German-speaking population (see Sudetenland). Today tourism is a major economic activity; in addition to hundreds of historic buildings, attractions include local museums, art galleries, theatres, and festivals. Pop. (2011) city, 13,557.